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Hydro-Tech Life-Lights
250-400 Watt Digital Maximum
[Hydro-tech address: 2121 Aurora Avenue, Seattle, WA 98109
 
 
SUN PULSE BULB SALE!
 
315w Philips Elite Agro system
Please call for pricing and quantity discounts--guaranteed less expensive than all other competitor
 
New! 50 watt Growlight for $150.00 each.
 
 
New! 50 watt Growlight with:
  • PAR or parobolic reflector built into the bulb,
    plus bulb-guard heat sink.
  • Elite grade, meaning over 90 CRI
    (color rendering index is the measure of full spectrum,
    with 100 CRI equivalent to natural sunlight)
  • low frequency e-ballast for greater efficiency and bulb life
  • excellent light for one plant,
    perfect for closets or kitchen counter-tops
 
Digital Electronic Ballast Systems
400w Sun Pulse PSMH light package: $295.00 - High frequency Solis Tek e-ballast, full-spectrum SP bulb, and quantum hood
400w Sun Pulse PSMH light package: $295.00
High frequency Solis Tek e-ballast, full-spectrum SP bulb, and quantum hood
 
400w Sun Pulse PSMH light package: $245.00 - High frequency Welthink e-ballast, full-spectrum SP bulb, and quantum hood.
400w Sun Pulse PSMH light package: $245.00
High frequency Welthink e-ballast, full-spectrum SP bulb, and quantum hood.
 

2014 Inventory now on sale

     
     
  Tissue Culture Kit.  
     
 

Tissue Culture Kit--$253

 
     
  Hydro Modules: aero-drip system by Hydrotech  
     
 

Hydro Modules: aero-drip system by Hydrotech

 
     
     
 
[Air Pots]
 
     
 
Air Pots (held together with plastic screws): Large - $8.50 Small - $3.50
 
     
  Cutting Kit includes: Rapid Rooter cubes in tray, Advanced Nutrient gel and liquid concentrate.  
     
 

Cutting Kit includes: Rapid Rooter cubes in tray, Advanced Nutrient gel and liquid concentrate.

 
     
  [Bacteria, Fungi & CO2]  
  Beneficial bacteria and fungi, and CO2 that is sprayed on
the leaves.
 
     
     
 
 
     
     
 
[Five packets of CO2]
 
 
 
 

Top Row: MYKOS WD - $22.50 | M-Drops - $9.00 | C02 - $25.00

 
 
Bottom Row: AZOS - $22.50 | MYKOS - $16.00
 
     
 
[Ona Liquid $39.95]
 
 
 
 

Ona Liquid $39.95

 
     
  [That Stuff - Containing Telsa Water]  
  Gallon containers of Tesla water. $40.00 per gallon
The one to counter spider mites is to be used in conjunction with a earlier application of pesticide. The one to counter mold/mildew is effective by itself in a foliar spray.
 
     
  [Budswell Guana gallon $30.00]  
  Budswell Guana gallon $30.00  
     
     
  [General Electric 70w cmh $54.00]  
 

General Electric 70w Bulb cmh $54.00

 
     
     
  White Reflector mostly for veg room. Accommodates plants of different height.  
     
 

White Reflector mostly for veg room. Accommodates plants of different height. $40.00 or $50.00, depending on size.

 
     
  Hydrotech Magnetic Ballast.  
     
 

Hydrotech magnetic ballast.

 
     
  20amp multi-light timer.  
     
 

20amp multi-light timer. $120.

 
     
  [30 or 40 amp multi-light timer. $250.00 no cord, $265.00 with cord.]  
     
  [9600w Timer $450.00]  
     
 

9600w Timer $450.00

 
     
 

30 or 40 amp multi-light timer. $250.00 no cord, $265.00 with cord.

 
     
  [Xtreme Water Pumps 75 g.p.h. $20.00, 120 g.p.h. $30.00, 220 g.p.h. $40.00]  
     
 

Xtreme Water Pumps 75 g.p.h. $20.00, 120 g.p.h. $30.00, 220 g.p.h. $40.00

 
     
  400w GE Conversion CMH with HPS Magnetic Ballast  
     
 

400w GE Conversion CMH with HPS Magnetic Ballast
Sale price of $190.00 for this system with slightly used copper-coil ballast.

 
     
  Air Laser for odor/fungus control.  
     
 
Air Laser for odor/fungus control
 
     
 
[70 Watt Light Ultra-CMH. 90+ color rendering higher lumens/watt than regular CMH. $165.00]
 
     
 
[150 Watt CMH. $165.00]
 
     
 
50 Watt CMH - $165.00
 
     
 
70 Watt CMH - $165.00
 
     
 
150 Watt CMH - $165.00
 
  Full Spectrum  
  Digital Ballast  
 

98% Reflective

 
     
 
[Dominion Organic Line]
 
 
Dominion Organic Line
 
 
Benefox, B-29, and Carburetor
 
 
All liters are $29.00 each.
 
 
All gallons are $75.00 each.
 
     
 
[Fertilizers - 1]
 
 
Organic Supplements for all phases of plant growth
 
 
One Liter - $29.00 One Gallon - $75.00
 
     
 
B-29 Contains :
 
 

*multiple B vitamins for root growth

 
 

*seaweed for trace elements, hormones, and vitamins

 
 
*humic acid and fulvic acid for nutrient absorption and cell growth
 
 
*chelated sugars for uptake into the plant
 
 
*enzymes to help digest nutrients
 
     
 
Carburetor contains:
 
 

*sugars to feed beneficial bacteria

 
 
*amino acids to help absorption and digestion
 
 
*vitamins to help growth
 
     
 

Benefox contains:

 
 
*10 strains of beneficial bacteria
 
 
*beneficial fungi to work with roots
 
     
 
Brix Blaster is a powder in three sizes:
 
 
300g = $35.00
 
 
454g = $50.00
 
 
1,000g = $75.00
 
 
Brix Blaster accelerates the Krebs Cycle
 
     
 
[Humbolt County's Own]
 
 
Humboldt County's Own:
 
 
*Snow Storm Ultra crystallizer 1 quart = $30.00
 
 
*Gravity flower hardener          8     oz = $27.00
 
 
*Bush Master--stem elongation
 
 
reducer and flower initiator       4     oz = $20
 
     
 
Superthrive rooter, various sizes
 
  =========================================================================================================  
 
[1000 watt bulbs]
 
 
Sun Pulse PSMH Bulbs
 
 
1000w Digital Compatible - $150.00
 
 
1000w Magnetic Only - $80.00
 
 
Comes in four spectrums
 
 
6.4K for rooting and most veg.
 
 
4K for General Purpose
 
 
3K for Quick Flowering
 
 
10K for Finishing
 
     
 
[600 watt bulbs]
 
     
 

[Fans 3-25-2011]

 
 
Ostberg Fan Ducts
 
 
8" Fan for $250.00
 
 
6" Fan for $200.00
 
     
  [General Electric 150w cmh bulb  $49.00]  
     
 

General Electric 150w cmh bulb $49.00

 
     
     
  [SunPulse 600w psmh $130.00]  
     
 

SunPulse 600w psmh $130.00

 
     
  [SunPulse 250w psmh $70.00]  
     
 

SunPulse 250w psmh $70.00

 
 

 

 
 

[400w General Electric cmh $69.00]

 
 

 

 
 

400w General Electric cmh $69.00

 
     
  [Sunpulse 1000w psmh $150.00]  
     
 

Sunpulse 1000w psmh $150.00

 
     
  [Sunpulse 400w psmh $110.00]  
     
 

Sunpulse 400w psmh $110.00

 
     
  [Sunpulse 1000w psmh bulb $80.00]  
     
 

Sunpulse 1000w possum bulb for magnetic or digital ballasts $150.00, for magnetic ballasts only $80.00

 
     
  [HPS/MH Electronic Ballast]  
     
 

Electronic Ballast 400w $150.00, 600w $200.00, 1000w coming soon

 
     
  [Reflector - $40.00]  
     
 

Reflector - $40.00

 
     
     
  [Scale $90.00]  
     
 

Scale $90.00

 
     
  [Digital Humidity and Tempature Meter $25.00]  
     
 

Digital Humidity and Tempature Meter $25.00

 
     
  [Light Meter $90.00]  
     
 

Light Meter $90.00

 
  [12 inch Ostberg fan $380.00]  
     
  12 inch Ostberg fan $380.00  
     
  [10 inch Ostberg fan $270.00]  
     
  10 inch Ostberg fan $270.00  
     
  [8 inch Ostberg fan $250.00]  
     
  8 inch Ostberg fan $250.00  
     
  [6 inch Ostberg fan $200.00]  
     
  6 inch Ostberg fan $200.00  
     
  [4 inch Ostberg fan $160.00]  
     
  4 inch Ostberg fan $160.00  
     
  [Hydroton 50 leiters $40.00]  
     
  Hydroton 50 leiters $40.00  
     
  [B29 and Carburetor are $75.00 a gallon and $29.00 a liter]  
     
  B29 and Carburetor are $75.00 a gallon and $29.00 a liter  
  [Benefox and Brix Blaster small $25 - 1 lb $50 - 2 lb $75.]  
     
  Benefox and Brix Blaster small $25.00, 1 lb $50.00, 2 lb $75.00  
     
  [Snowstorm Ultra, Crystal Burst, Gravity, Bush Master]  
  Snowstorm Ultra, Crystal Burst, Gravity, Bush Master - $30.00 qt., $27.00 8oz., $20.00 4oz  
     
     
     
  Tabby the new kitten  
 

Tabby the new kitten - not for sale.

 
     
   


  • Uses the same light as above (Modular)
  • Multiple points of light, and spinning, guarantees even distribution of light
  • Spinning cools equipment and room
  • $2,480 - $2,680 Four Lights with Spinner
  • $1,540 - $1,740 Two Lights with Spinner



w/Hydro-tech ballast, fixture, and reflectors

  • All aluminum, vented ballast enclosure
  • Phillips 4K CMH bulb is 85 CRI (for veg)
  • GE 3K CMH bulb is 80 CRI (for bloom)
  • Package with white hood and Phillips bulb is $265.00
  • Package with silver hood and GE bulb is $365.00
  • Other combinations of bulbs and reflectors are possible
Silver Hood - 98% Reflective
White hood - 91% reflective Silver hood - 98% reflective
Peel off protective plastic before using


Artificial Lighting in Horticulture

Of the inter-related factors for indoor plant growing, grow lights are the most important. The most important part of lighting, is the light bulb. We sell three types of grow lights:

When considering which type of bulb to buy, the main features to look for are spectrum and output. For additional investment, you can fine-tune the spectrum to the stage of plant growth, and/or spin the lights.

Light Bulb Spectrum

Full-spectrum is best. Of course the sun is full spectrum, and plants have evolved for many millions of years to adapt to sunlight. If all the colors below were equally present in a light, the result would be white.



Below, the chart on the left is what the human eye sees; on the right, what the plant prefers:

The Lumen rating of a bulb is not a good measurement for plant growth, because it is based on what the human eye can see. A full spectrum light is like music, with bass, treble, and everything in between.

High Output Bulbs

The best full-spectrum lights for digital ballasts are Pulse Start Metal Halide (PMSH). The best full-spectrum lights for magnetic ballasts are Ceramic Metal Halide (CMH). That is because in addition to being a true full spectrum, they are also high output.

Here is the Spectral Chart:

Chart for 4k CMH

High Pressure Sodium (hps)


HPS is high output, but not full spectrum; it is mostly yellow-orange. Premium hps like Hortilux are super, that is, higher output than standard hps; but don't last as long as standard output. HPS works well only at high levels of intensity, so it takes more watts to get the job done. HPS uses a ceramic arc tube which is glued together and leaks with heat stress.

There are no high pressure sodium bulbs designed for use with electronic ballasts. The extra heat stress on HPS bulbs from electronic ballasts will shorten bulb life and will cause premature leaking of heavy metals onto the plants. I recommend using HPS only if you think you HAVE to grow plants over 2.5 ' tall.

Probe Start Quartz Metal Halide

These can be spectrum-enhanced, like Sunmaster, but are not true full spectrum like Sun-Pulse or CMH. To slightly enhance output of standard halides, output is sacrificed.

Many are not even super bulbs (position-oriented), but are universal position, which sacrifices another 10% of the output. Standard Metal Halide bulbs do not operate very efficiently in the horizontal orientation even if they were super. These bulbs are subject to pre-mature failure with electronic ballasts.

Distribution of light unto leaf surfaces

While it is true that a 1000 watt light is the highest output, a single point of light would concentrate the light too much in one small spot, instead of evenly distributing over a larger area. Right below the heat zone around a bulb, is the zone of too-high intensity. This can best be measured with a light meter. Probably the optimum level of intensity is 4300 foot candles; 5500 foot candles would be the maximum and not all varieties want 5500 fc under all environmental conditions.

Generally, two 400 watt cmh will outperform any 1000w light. Because:

  • number of angles of light is doubled,
  • more intersection of the fringe areas,
  • the spectrum is better,
  • heat is less.

Fewer watts leads to lower room temperatures and prolongs equipment life. A room temperature of 76F is optimum for the light-on period. The best way to improve light distribution and lower temperature is to spin the lights at a rapid rate.

Fine-tuning Spectrum for Different Stages

Different portions of the spectrum perform different functions. Blue light has the highest energy level, reduces stem elongation, increases rooting, and induces growth hormones. Red light has the greatest ability to bounce and penetrate the leaf canopy, increases growth of leafs and buds, and induces blooming hormones.

The plant cannot overdose on plant hormones; excessive amounts are simply stored. That is why you can use a full spectrum light for all stages. However, by enhancing relevant portions of the spectrum depending on the stage, you can increase efficiency of plant growth.

Pulse-start metal halides are more efficient than standard metal halide. They require a special ballast; standard halide ballasts won't work for them. Life Light makes PSMH Ballasts in four different spectrums:

  • 3K
  • 4K
  • 6.5K
  • 10K

These Life Lights are full-spectrum, with a particular emphasis depending on what is needed most at each particular stage. I recommend:

  • 6.4K for veg. (start the bloom period with 24 hours of darkness to jumpstart your bloom stage).
  • 3K for most of bloom.
  • 10K for last week of bloom (for finishing).

People often make the mistake of thinking, if they use electronic ballasts or the latest complicated device, they are the most advanced. However, you will get better results with a good bulb even with a magnetic ballast, than you will with a mediocre bulb with an electronic ballast.

Ideally, you want both a good bulb and an electronic, with rapid spinning. That narrows the choice| considerably, as not all electronic ballasts run all types of bulbs.

General Hydroponics

The following is from an article by Larry Brooks, published in Growing Edge, Fall, 1990. This comment is particularly relevant:

The plants are supported above the flowing nutrient. The roots hang down through an air gap in which nutrient is sprayed, then into the moving nutrient solution below the air gap. The nutrient sprayed through the air gap is not so much intended to feed the plant, but rather to infuse oxygen into the nutrient solution wherein the feeder roots remain constantly submerged. It is these submerged roots in oxygen rich nutrient that provides most of the nutrition and oxygen for the plant.

The Seattle Hydroponics aero-drip system is similar, but instead of spraying the roots, water is supplied to the top of the medium. I recommend grow-rocks for the medium, because it drains fast. I don't recommend emitters because they constrict the opening, which tends to lead to clogs. The higher flow-rate means you want a fast-draining medium like grow-rocks. Rockwool doesn't drain fast enough for this system, and is not re-usable (grow-rocks can easily be re-used).

Larry's system requires spraying the roots, and the sprayer tends to clog, isn't easily visible or easy to work on. The sprayed water doesn't penetrate the medium very well, so the plant basket has to be very small. Larry's system relies upon long roots growing into the nutrient solution, however to get roots this long may take a while.

My system enables a larger plant basket, so there is plenty of root space. This means your plant won't fall over. The water is passively irrigated by a large surface area (each bucket stores some water) and water trickling through the air.

By Larry Brooks

The aero-hydroponic method was developed in Israel in the early 1980s. Dr. Hillel Soffer, senior researcher at the Volcani Institute at Ein Gedi developed the aero-hydroponic method to overcome the challenges presented by the hot, arid conditions at Ein Gedi. The discoveries that followed the development of aero-hydroponics offer great benefits to all hydroponic growers.

During a two-year period from 1986 to 1988, Dr. Soffer performed extensive research using the aero-hydroponic method at the University of California at Davis, where he had received his Ph.D. in the early 1970s. The specific area of research was in quantifying the effect of various levels of dissolved oxygen on root growth, especially in the propagation of plants from cuttings.

The findings of his research were published in the Journal of the American Society for Horticultural Science, and HortScience. Both studies were co-authored with David Burger at UCD. In addition, Dr. Soffer presented his findings at the annual conference of the Hydroponic Society of America in 1988.

Except for the papers mentioned above, very little has been printed up to now on the aero-hydroponic method. The method was patented internationally, though few licenses for the production of equipment have been granted. Without aggressive commercial support, the aero-hydroponic method has remained largely a research tool, known mostly to university researchers.In the meantime, the rockwool method was becoming available internationally following 12 years of exhaustive research and a strong marketing program with lots of investment in advertising, production and distribution, first in Europe and later in Japan.

Following nearly a decade of rockwool use, the Dutch contacted Dr. Soffer to request permission to develop and use the aero-hydroponic method. The reason for the sudden interest of the Dutch in the aero-hydroponic method has implications for the development of hydroponic cultivation worldwide.

For rockwool cultivation to work efficiently in most commercial operations it is preferred to a use a non-recirculating nutrient solution. Nutrient solution is sent on a one-way trip through the rockwool and is then discarded. The real cost advantage of rockwool cultivation over other hydroponic methods was that the nutrient did not have to be recaptured and recirculated, reducing the system complexity of reservoirs, plumbing, pumps and pH and conductivity controllers.

The once-through nutrient system also reduces the problem of nutrient solution becoming imbalanced due to erratic uptake of minerals by rapidly growing plants; plus the build up of dissolved minerals from slowly dissolving rockwool.

The discharge of enormous amounts of spent nutrient solution has become a major problem in Holland, contaminating surface and ground waters. Consequently, the Dutch government has prohibited the dumping of nutrients resulting in renewed interest in recirculating systems such as aero-hydroponics.

As leaders in both horticulture and commercial hydroponics, the Dutch have recognized the value of a method, which enables rapid and trouble-free cultivation and eliminates the problems of disposing of spent nutrients and exhausted media.

Aero-hydroponics is not a simple method to understand. The equipment required is somewhat more complicated than other hydroponic methods, but there is a great advantage in that once an aero-hydroponic system is set up, it will run almost indefinitely without additional investment in such disposable components as growing media and non-recirculating nutrients.

What is most surprising about aero-hydroponics is not how it works, but why plants grow better. The key is dissolved oxygen at the root boundary zone.

The essence of Dr. Soffer's work at UCD was in quantifying root growth in proportion to dissolved oxygen. Only the green parts of the plant can form oxygen from carbon dioxide - roots require a supply of oxygen for metabolism and growth. Plant growth in oxygen deficient conditions, such as those found in many soils, is limited. Dr. Soffer found the enhanced oxygen at the root zone produced enhanced growth.

In aero-hydroponics, the nutrient solution is sprayed through the air in order to infuse the nutrient with dissolved oxygen. The method differs from classic aeroponics in that most of the plant's roots are not suspended in air and fed by a spray of nutrient solution; rather, the majority of the roots are submerged in oxygen-infused nutrient which is in constant motion in order t maintain high levels of dissolved oxygen at the root boundary zone where oxygen and nutrients are taken in by the plant.

The result is a propagating tool of unsurpassed performance. Dr. Soffer was successful in propagating plant varieties at UCD that had never been propagated before. He took particular delight in propagating varieties of conifers and even pistachio trees (pistachio cuttings required 90 days to generate roots). Moreover, he found that cuttings could be rooted aero-hydroponically in purified water without using rooting hormones such as IBA or NAA. This is because plant tissue already contains the natural rooting hormone IAA (Indole Acetic Acid).

Aero-hydroponic systems can be built using quite a variety of materials and in numerous design configurations. The Ein Gedi "Mini Unit" which was used at UCD for dissolved oxygen studies is a stand-alone module which supports four plants in 10 liters of nutrient solution. An electric motor mounted on the top of the unit spins a nutrient sprayer, which lifts nutrient solution and sprays it onto the "aerial roots". Additionally, the rotation causes the nutrient within the unit to stir, moving it constantly over the submerged roots.

Large-scale aero-hydroponic systems follow the design of the commercial installation at Ein Gedi. These commercial systems consist of "canals" or growing chambers with plant sites on top. A pump provides the pressure to drive a system of sprayers to supply the aerial roots, while the submerged roots hang into the flowing nutrient in the canal.

Both of these systems share fundamental characteristics, which define the aero-hydroponic method. The plants are supported above the flowing nutrient. The roots hang down through an air gap in which nutrient is sprayed, then into the moving nutrient solution below the air gap.

The nutrient sprayed through the air gap is not so much intended to feed the plant, but rather to infuse oxygen into the nutrient solution wherein the feeder roots remain constantly submerged. It is these submerged roots in oxygen rich nutrient that provides most of the nutrition and oxygen for the plant.


Greetings,

I am writing to make you aware of a serious situation that has become a more widespread problem. If you don't use supplemental HID lighting, then this posting won't apply to your application. This email is for those people using electronic ballasts with HID (high intensity discharge) lamps. Electronic ballasts are being sold around the world at this time, and have been for several years, to the horticultural industry that are replacing traditional magnetic, "core and coil" ballasts.

What's the problem?

  1. Your wall voltage, and the traditional ballasts, operate at a frequency of 50 or 60 hertz, depending on where you are in the world.
  2. Electronic ballasts operate at a higher frequency that can range from 22,000 hertz all the way up to 130,000 hertz +.
  3. Every HID lamp made, except one, was made for 50 or 60 hz
  4. Every major brand HID lamp on the market around the world will fail prematurely, or not ignite, on a high frequency electronic ballast.
  5. These failures have been happening for at least four years.
  6. Every HID lamp contains Mercury, among other gases, that are contained in the arc tube.
  7. By operating a 22,000 hertz ballast and using a 50/60 hertz HID bulb, you will have premature lamp failure.
  8. The ballast drives the lamp, like an amp drives a speaker. Imagine using a 60 hertz amplifier on a 22,000 hertz speaker, it's not going to last long because they weren't made for each other.
  9. A high pressure sodium (HPS) lamp for example, when used on an e-ballast, will cause the arc stream in the arc tube to rub up against the arc tube itself. That causes holes and fissures to form, and glues become unseated in the lamp, releasing the gases, including mercury.
  10. HPS lamps are typically never sealed at the mogul base, e.g.
  11. Hot runs to cold, a law of thermodynamics. Those hot gases in the lamp will then run out of the lamp through the holes in the lamp base.
  12. Whatever is underneath that HPS lamp will then receive the fallout from the gas, and mercury release. In our case, its the plants.

Who says that's true?

Hortilux, a very popular horticultural lamp manufacturer, says its true. In an article released in the October 2008 Maximum Yield magazine, written by Hortilux themselves, they stated their lamps were not suitable for use on electronic ballasts. There have been articles written about this topic in Urban Garden Magazine as well. This isn't new news, but it may be the first you're hearing about it, like most I speak with. The articles have been out some time now.

Just one brand of HID lamps, Sun Pulse Lamps, were designed for the high frequency electronic ballasts, a simple statement of fact, not sales. These lamps have been out for almost a decade, and have been proven in the field. All other HID lamps weren't designed for the electronic ballast. You can call the lamp manufacturers yourselves, and ask, "are your HID lamps certified for use on high frequency electronic ballasts?" They'll tell you they aren't. Sun Pulse was the only company that could say yes, and explain why.

If you look into this independently, you'll discover the same thing that I have, that there are an epidemic of lamp failures happening now, and this must be stopped. Any savings you might get by using an electronic ballast, is lost when the wrong lamp is used. The problem here is that the lamp companies don't make ballasts, the ballast companies don't make lamps, and they don't integrate together. It needs to be a certified matched set.

This email is to insure the safety of the end-users, who didn't hear this message when buying these lighting systems with electronic ballasts, and also to insure the safety of our food supply.

Dan Lubkeman, President

Hydroponic Society of America


Hydroponic gardening is available today with the latest advancements in hydroponic and lighting technology developed at Seattle Hydroponics. We also offer organic plant fertilizer, and pure chemical plant food--in such brands as NuFarm, General Hydroponics, Advanced Nutrients, House and Garden, Botanicare, Budswell, and Earth Juice. A hydroponic system with horticultural lighting, or organic soil with agricultural plant lighting, both can yield good results. Coco-peat is another good option, about halfway between soil and hydroponics. Hydro-tech is a full-service grow shop, offering discount hydroponics for hydro-gardening, in addition to growlamps and General Hydroponics fertilizers.

Hydroponic Light energy for plant growth can be provided by a wide variety of grow lamps: standard metal halide, high pressure sodium, ceramic metal halide, or pulse-start metal halide. Lighting is the most important element in plant growth. Ceramic Metal Halide is the best single light for growing plants; because it is full-spectrum with a balance between red and blue spectrum. The GE Digital Maximum is the only electronic ballast capable of runing the Ceramic Metal Halide bulb, because low-frequency output is required. CMH bulbs can also be run on the HPS magnetic ballast, typically 400 watt. The Pulse-Start Metal Halide bulbs can come in different spectrums: cutting/rooting: 4K rapid vegetative: 6.5K last week of veg: 4K most of bloom: 3K last week of bloom: 10K

Either switch all PSMH bulbs for each stage, or use a combination and blend together for full spectrum with a spinner. Super HPS (premium hps like Eye Lighting Hortilux) or standard high pressure sodium have been used for indoor gardening. pioneered in Seattle. However the HPS is an incomplete spectrum, and would need to be supplemented by blue spectrum light. Hortilux is a super-sodium, the high output partially compensating for the deficiency in blue spectrum. Putting a halide bulb together with an HPS bulb in the same outer jacket is not a good way to achieve full spectrum; because the halide lasts only half as long as the HPS, bulb life is shortened. CMH has more blue than a conventional Metal Halide, and more red than the HPS (which is mostly yellow-orange). Using the same ballast for both MH and HPS arc tubes causes inefficiency, whether swtiched or in the same outer envelope.

The Digital Maximum ballast is made by General Electric (GE). The Digi-Max light is the Digital Maximum with Life Light Technology socket fixture and reflector.

The Digital Maximum Digital Ballast has a microprocessor for better bulb performance; and will run CMH or PMSH bulbs by General Electric, Venture or Philips. For 600 Watt and 400 Watt E-Ballasts we feature the Lumatek Ballast. The Lumatek e-ballast will run Pulse-Start Metal Halide (PSMH), or Probe-Start Metal Halide (Old Style MH), or High Pressure Sodium (HPS); but not Ceramic Metal Halide (CMH). Which is why we carry Lumatek e-ballsts for 600w and 1000w, but the GE Digital Maximum e-ballast for 250-400 watt range, as well as the 100w CMH sidelights

The future in hydroponic gardening is available today with the latest advancements in hydroponic and lighting technology developed at Seattle Hydroponics. We also offer organic plant fertilizer, and pure chemical plant food--in such brands as NuFarm, General Hydroponics, Advanced Nutrients, House and Garden, Botanicare, Budswell, and Earth Juice. A hydroponic system with horticultural lighting, or organic soil with agricultural plant lighting, both can yield good results. Coco-peat is another good option, about halfway between soil and hydroponics.

Hydro-tech is a full-service grow shop, offering discount hydroponics for hydro-gardening, in addition to growlamps and General Hydroponics fertilizers. Light energy for plant growth can be provided by a wide variety of grow lamps: standard metal halide, high pressure sodium, ceramic metal halide, or pulse-start metal halide.

Lighting is the most important element in plant growth. Ceramic Metal Halide is the best single light for growing plants; because it is full-spectrum with a balance between red and blue spectrum. The GE Ultra-Max is the only electronic ballast capable of runing the Ceramic Metal Halide bulb, because low-frequency output is required. CMH bulbs can also be run on the HPS magnetic ballast, typically 400 watt. The Pulse-Start Metal Halide bulbs can come in different spectrums:

  • cutting/rooting: 4K
  • rapid vegetative: 6.5K
  • last week of veg: 4K
  • most of bloom: 3K
  • last week of bloom: 10K\par

Either switch all PSMH bulbs for each stage, or use a combination and blend together for full spectrum with a spinner. Super HPS (premium hps like Eye Lighting Hortilux) or standard high pressure sodium have been used for indoor gardening. pioneered in Seattle. However the HPS is an incomplete spectrum, and would need to be supplemented by blue spectrum light. Hortilux is a super-sodium, the high output partially compensating for the deficiency in blue spectrum. Putting a halide bulb together with an HPS bulb in the same outer jacket is not a good way to achieve full spectrum; because the halide lasts only half as long as the HPS, bulb life is shortened. CMH has more blue than a conventional Metal Halide, and more red than the HPS (which is mostly yellow-orange). Using the same ballast for both MH and HPS arc tubes causes inefficiency, whether swtiched or in the same outer envelope.

The Ultra-Max ballast is made by General Electric (GE). The Digi-Max light is the Ultra-Max with Life Light Technology socket fixture and reflector. The Ultra-Max Digital Ballast has a microprocessor for better bulb performance; and will run CMH or PMSH bulbs by General Electric, Venture or Philips. For 600 Watt and 400 Watt E-Ballasts we feature the Lumatek Ballast.

The Lumatek e-ballast will run Pulse-Start Metal Halide (PSMH), \line or Probe-Start Metal Halide (Old Style MH), or High Pressure Sodium (HPS); but not Ceramic Metal Halide (CMH). Which is why we carry\line Lumatek e-ballsts for 600w and 1000w, but the GE Ultra-Max e-ballast for 250-400 watt range, as well as the 100w CMH sidelights.


Related Links

American Hydroponics
Life-Light Technologies
1st-Spot Gardening
4 Garden Info
Hydroponic Stores Worldwide
Humboldt Wholesale
Steiger Family
Glenns Garden
American Hydro
Wacky Worlds of Worms
Maximum Yield
mygarden.net
Simply Hydroponics
Flora Hydroponics
Advanced Nutrients
Hydro 1 Stop

Internal Links
Digital Electronic Ballast Systems
Life Lights Digital Maximum Light Array
GE 3K ceramic metal halide
Artificial Lighting in Horticulture
Light Bulb Spectrum
High Output Bulbs
High Pressure Sodium (hps)
Probe Start Quartz Metal Halide
Distribution of light unto leaf surfaces
Fine-tuning Spectrum for Different Stages
General Hydroponics
Aero-drip hydroponics
Compatibility issues with Electronic Ballasts
General Information